Making Photo Choices in Siouxland, Lincoln, NE

31 Jan

Traveling around Siouxland and points thereabouts I find there is always a photographic opportunity. Some opportunities are better than others, but there are images to be made if one looks. I sometimes think I photograph too much, but if one is someplace, I remind myself that it might be sometime before I return again. Erring on the side caution I will photograph the same scene in different ways and sometimes using different white balances.

Plenty of outdoor seating available on the walkway up to Nebraska’s State Capitol this time of year in Lincoln, NE Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Recently on a visit to the state capitol of Nebraska, in Lincoln, I found the architecture absolutely stunning. The inside was gorgeous with various motifs and use of architectural elements. But of a concern to a photographer was the lighting. Pushing the ISO and using a fairly wide aperture and slow shutter speed and deciding which white balance. As a former newspaper photographer I strive to get it right in the camera, mostly shooting jpegs these days rather than raw. From the film days, unless using B&W film, I strove to photograph scenes using film tailored to the situation. Inside like in the capitol would require tungsten film because the lighting was warm and one might want to present the scene as neutrally as possible as seen by the human eye.

Daylight film would turn the scene orangish.

In a hallway in Nebraska’s State Capitol in Lincoln, NE Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Whereas a tungsten white balance setting or film would approximate it more the way the eye sees it.

In a hallway in Nebraska’s State Capitol in Lincoln, NE Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And yet, sometimes there is an in between. Maybe not a great difference, but subtly some areas take on a cooler look in areas.

In a hallway in Nebraska’s State Capitol in Lincoln, NE Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

So I photographed with a white balance of daylight, and later do slight adjustments to cool the scene while leaving it mainly warm in tone and feeling.  I also chose to use the incandescent white balance setting to render the image in a neutral (subjective as to what an individual considers neutral) representation.

And as stated centuries before, it’s in the eye of the beholder, in this case the photographer, to decide what to present to a viewer.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

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