Archive | History RSS feed for this section

Remembering in Siouxland on Memorial Day, Sioux City

25 May

Flags flutter in the breeze at city owned Graceland Park Cemetery Friday, May 22, 2020 in Sioux City, Iowa. Because of COVID-19 an annual Memorial Day celebration has changed to a drive by Honor Guard to be held at Memorial Park Cemetery. Stormy weather is expected for the area Monday. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Memorial Day is an annual event of remembrance in Siouxland and elsewhere in the U.S. A time to reflect and honor our loved ones and those who have served in the armed forces of this nation. This year’s day like other days going forward will be a new experience for many.

A wife watches her husband clean his parents’ grave site at Memorial Park Cemetery Friday, May 22, 2020 in Sioux City, Iowa. Because of COVID-19 an annual Memorial Day celebration has changed to a drive by Honor Guard to be held at Memorial Park Cemetery. Stormy weather is expected for the area Monday. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Helping her grandmother, a young woman looks for grave sites of those who served in the military to place a flag at Memorial Park Cemetery Friday, May 22, 2020 in Sioux City, Iowa. Her grandfather is a member of the American Legion. Because of COVID-19 an annual Memorial Day celebration has changed to a drive by Honor Guard to be held at Memorial Park Cemetery. Stormy weather is expected for the area Monday. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The coronavirus pandemic has given all people a moment of pause. Creating a variety of stress for some and only adding to stress others already felt because of life’s circumstances. And going forward this year’s remembrance may cause people to reflect more deeply as the official start of summer. But maybe I am too optimistic in that respect  that people will actually take stock and be thankful for those who have come before and continue to protect this nation and give it a sense of honor where others who should do not.

Families decorate grave sites of loved ones at Graceland Park Cemetery Friday, May 22, 2020 in Sioux City, Iowa. Because of COVID-19 an annual Memorial Day celebration has changed to a drive by Honor Guard to be held at Memorial Park Cemetery. Stormy weather is expected for the area Monday. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A grounds keeper trims grave sites at Memorial Park Cemetery Friday, May 22, 2020 in Sioux City, Iowa. Because of COVID-19 an annual Memorial Day celebration has changed to a drive by Honor Guard to be held at Memorial Park Cemetery. Stormy weather is expected for the area Monday. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And in a year’s time, will folk look back and be thankful for such a pause in routine, or still curse and not think of it at all but for being a disruption they should have done without. Human beings are a fickled lot. While many are thankful, I sometimes wonder if most are just expectant of what they deserve, some more than others. Life’s circumstances have benefited some more than others, sometimes unfairly. But that is for someone else to judge, and sometimes I kind of hope, harshly.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A grounds keeper puts up a tent for a Honor Guard at Memorial Park Cemetery Friday, May 22, 2020 in Sioux City, Iowa. Because of COVID-19 an annual Memorial Day celebration has changed to a drive by Honor Guard to be held at Memorial Park Cemetery. Stormy weather is expected for the area Monday. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Backroads in Siouxland, rural Pottawatamie County

15 Apr

A barn in Pottawatamie County near Crescent, Iowa Friday, March 20, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Recently I did a bit driving some rural, country roads in Siouxland’s southern region. No other vehicles passing by for the most part it was nice to get out and breathe some fresh air and forget about current events. I am still enthralled with the older barns I find in the area, each with history of its own and all past the days of former glory.

A house or small barn on a gravel road near Loveland, Iowa Friday, March 20, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The Siouxland region and country itself has gone through some changes when these places and others like them thrived in their heyday. Some good and others questionable. Time will tell about the end results of changes. In the meantime I just want to enjoy these relics and ponder their time in the sun and continue exploring the backroads.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Detail of a house or barn on a gravel road near Loveland, Iowa Friday, March 20, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Enjoying the View in Siouxland, Sioux City

26 Mar

Two geese enjoy some “box seats” while visiting the Sioux City Historic Railroad Museum in Sioux City, Iowa Friday, March 13, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Sometimes depending on the event and venue, a person, or animal can get lucky and find themselves enjoying the view from a “box seat”. These two geese at the Sioux City Railroad Museum, found the perfect spot to watch the surrounding area and look for friends dropping by. The day I visited was not busy and these two had the place to themselves and the solitude, except for their honking recognition of a passer-by, to enjoy the day.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Two geese enjoy some “box seats” while visiting the Sioux City Historic Railroad Museum in Sioux City, Iowa Friday, March 13, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

History surrounds Siouxland, Fort Omaha, Omaha, NE

21 Feb

A former departmental headquarters of historic Fort Omaha in the late 1800’s, now the Metropolitan Community College media and library center, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The Siouxland region and parts surrounding Siouxland are steeped in history. As hard as it is to remember sometimes that Iowa, Nebraska, both Dakotas and other midwest and western states were at one time open territory and prairie before the land rush that brought settlers and others who “tamed the land”. Previously populated by Native American Tribes that followed the buffalo and other seasonal practices involving roaming a large swatch of land.

A sign post with history about historic Fort Omaha, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

A large part of the college is still open as it was during the days the fort was in use, primarily as parade grounds or muster grounds for troops located or passing through to other outposts.

History of the Omaha barracks and parade grounds at historic Fort Omaha, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

The parade grounds at historic Fort Omaha, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

As warmer weather approaches it will be nice to be able to spend more time learning about area history as opposed to rushing back to a warm vehicle out of the cold. And seeing what other gems are about Siouxland.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Part of the parade grounds at historic Fort Omaha, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Revisiting History around Siouxland, General Crook, Omaha, NE

15 Feb

Cabin fever is working on my wanderlust to begin exploring Siouxland area again without slipping and sliding to and from a destination. Although it’s only February and already the warm weather temps that have graced the region recently will depart a short bit as a bitter winter front and some snow moves into the area again.

The Douglas County Historical Society chronicles the history of General George Crook’s home at historic Fort Omaha, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by jerry L Mennenga©)

Recently visiting the Omaha area I checked out but didn’t stop into see General Crook’s museum home at Fort Omaha in Omaha, Nebraska. It’s a glimpse into a time frame in the early frontier days as the west was being”tamed” for settlers heading in that direction. General George Crook was commandant of Fort Omaha and was responsible for patrolling and keeping safe a region that included Iowa, Nebraska, parts of Idaho, Wyoming and Montana. His home is a well preserved specimen and fun to look into the past and see what life was like on the prairie for a higher ranking officer. There are a number of homes along that ridge top that housed officers of the fort while the enlisted men bunked in larger housing facilities down the hill.

General George Crook was commander at historic Fort Omaha during the early frontier days, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A plague gives a history about General George Crook’s home at historic Fort Omaha, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by jerry L Mennenga©)

The warmer days makes it easier to get out and about again but patience for the return of some greenery will probably be a few more weeks coming as winter lingers and Mother nature teases us about the coming spring.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A garden spot now dormant behind the General George Crook home museum at historic Fort Omaha, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Old Glory hangs on the front porch of the General George Crook home museum at historic Fort Omaha, now the Metropolitan Community College, in Omaha, NE Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (photo by jerry L Mennenga©)

Learning History in Siouxland, Winnebago, NE

11 Feb

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I don’t think I will ever tire of learning about history. And more importantly history that occurs here in Siouxland. Sometimes it does take a little effort to seek it out and spend some time learning, but I always think in the end it’s time well spent.

The clan sculpture garden in Winnebago, NE gives a visitor a glimpse of the Winnebago Tribe what originates and still resides in Wisconsin but because of abuse at the ends of the federal government “liberating” lands for the movement of white settlers, part of the tribe was relocated to Nebraska.

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The sculpture garden has one piece for each clan and plaques that explain what is represented and representative of each.

in Winnebago, Nebraska Friday June 22, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

It is a bit of a hidden gem but worth the time to stop and learn and appreciate. History never lies, it’s just how its told by individuals that spin it to put forth their own “truth” or shades there of about it. Other agendas by people who generally do not want the truth known, or prefer to skirt because of interests that belie what is real and what becomes myth.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

in Winnebago, Nebraska Friday June 22, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Seeing Light in Siouxland, Winnebago, NE

22 Jan

Photography is always dependent on light. How much, its color and quality depends on the photographer. Understanding what one wants and what is needed is a choice. I like light. A lot of it or little of it. Depending on the subject matter and the situation in which I am photographing. Traveling around Siouxland I do a lot of photography in natural or available light. But sometimes when photographing I plan ahead and see the need to include additional or supplemental light. I don’t always carry a flash, but it does come in handy.

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Depending on how one wants to portray a subject within an image supplemental light can enhance the subject. Helping define it even more. And therein lies the choice. How much light.

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I sometimes believe that old adage that less is more. Direct flash adds light to a subject, but can also take away the impact one might be trying to create. It also makes the subject look flat. Photographing sunsets with a subject can be enhanced by adding light. So instead of a silhouette, one creates an image that maybe has a bit more drama or interest.

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Much like the artist who created and sculpted the clan members in the Statue Garden in Winnebago, NE, light can be used to sculpt the the statues thereby giving them more of a dimensional shape. It also allows the sunset to create more an intense color palette for the background that will hopefully enhance the image rather than take away from it. Previously when I worked for daily newspapers I used flash a lot more than I do now. A lot of times its use was adding fill light to subjects so they could be clearly seen. But my preference was always for using the light to create an image that I liked and that would enhance the subject, living or not, and make it more memorable for the reader and viewer of an article thereby hoping for a lasting impression so the reader and viewer would both enjoy and remember the story that the photograph accompanied.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

The Clans Sculpture Garden in HoChunk Village in Winnebago, NE Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. The twelve clans include the buffalo clan, eagle clan, water spirit clan, thunder clan, snake clan, hawk clan, fish clan, pigeon clan, deer clan, elk clan and wolf clan (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

%d bloggers like this: