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Enjoying History in Siouxland, Without Knowing it, rural South Dakota, Beresford

20 May

Older barns in disrepair seen Friday, April 8, 2022 in rural South Dakota, located south of Beresford, SD. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

When I traverse various parts of Siouxland while driving about I find that I see fewer and fewer older wooden barn. The rustic look, even in disrepair, hail to an era that has for the most part passed. Farmers or those farming ( industrial operations) no longer erect the wooden structures that at one time housed animals, harvested crops and machinery. As the bigger is better mantra continues to envelope America and it’s ideal of business the small farmer also has disappeared and the structures now that house equipment is metal or fiberglass. More cost effective, less maintenance and all of those things that attribute to the bottom line.

But I miss seeing the structures. And most times I happen upon them at the wrong time of day while out driving around. Maybe seeing them in passing. Sometimes stopping, sometimes not, depending on if I am time constrained to arrive someplace.

Two older barns seen Friday, April 8, 2022 in rural South Dakota, located south of Beresford, SD. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The rustic nature appeals to my visual sense, but the use and disuse and decay speaks to another passing of an era where form and factor are no longer valued. That thought could be addressed to a lot of areas and state of affairs these days. When at a small time museum a few years ago a docent was showing school children and older wall phone which had the spin knob to wind it up and get a connection along with the ear piece held to one’s head and the extended speaker you had to lean into to speak with the operator, as well as the desk top model with the rotary dial.

The children had no idea what the two items were, and were quite astonished when they learned that what they carried in their pockets and took for granted was large, non moveable and didn’t have a screen. Advances in technology is marvelous with many wonderful inventions, but sometimes I wonder at what loss does this occur without the accompanying history that brought the state of humanity to this next level of achievement and the effort to get there.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

An older barn in disrepair seen Friday, April 8, 2022 in rural South Dakota, located south of Beresford, SD. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Art is in the Eye of the Beholder in Siouxland, Making Decision on Representation, Little Sioux Park, Correctionville

16 May

A slow shutter speed exposure of water running in the Little Sioux City River at Little Sioux Park near Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Deciding how best sometimes to represent a scene found in Siouxland, or anywhere is dependent upon the person. And sometimes the representation doesn’t quite fulfill the artist’s or photographer’s intent.

Photographing moving water with a slow shutter speed, during daylight without a neutral density filter doesn’t quite capture the scene as well as very early morning or early evening when using a slow shutter speed would be more beneficial. But it doesn’t hurt to try, and practicing seeing and the skills and mechanics one has at hand is always a good thing I believe. Practice makes one better at achieving results and seeing in the first place. Of course, being prepared is helpful. But I don’t pack the suitcase when I go out photographing and walking. A couple lenses and a camera body and I utilize what I have at hand. Grateful when something works out, aw shucks when it doesn’t.

Of course, there is always tomorrow and another walk. I might not encounter the same scene with the same elements and lighting, but that’s the beauty of taking walks and exploring.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A correct exposure of water flowing in the Little Sioux River at Little Sioux Park near Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Enjoying Art in Siouxland, Regional Art Show, Orange City

14 May

A little self promotion with one of the blogger’s own photos seen at the reception and selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Recently I attended the 2022 annual Regional Art Show held at a gallery and theatre on the campus of Northwester College in Orange City. I don’t often enter juried shows since I seldom am ever selected, and assume my years dedication to editorial content isn’t what catches the eye of artists who generally select images for these types of shows. And that is fine. Lord knows I could never had made a living if I relied on clothing and feeding and shelter from the sales of prints I have done over the years.

Attendees for a reception walk about looking at the artwork selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Attendees for a reception walk about looking at the artwork selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Attendees for a reception walk about looking at the artwork selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I do immensely enjoy seeing other artists’ work, whether photographic, paintings, photography or sculptural (wood and ceramic). The time and patience these folk put into their work is exceptional. I have heard some argue that “snapping a photo” is not so unique and there is little work involved.

Although I have also read and believe, where an artist works with a blank canvas and then adds elements to create their vision, the photographer starts with everything visible and then must work to eliminate those distracting elements to just retain the visual items he/she wants a viewer to see within their work.

Attendees for a reception walk about looking at the artwork selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Mitch Keller, president of the Sioux City Camera club seen with his entry selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

One attendee reads through the list of artists while others attending the reception walk about looking at the artwork selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

When I can I like to visit local universities and wander the art department hallways looking at student work and also museums within and nearby Siouxland to view and admire and maybe attempt some form or representation of the seen work. When “creating” art it would seem that folk must pre-visualize the end product, although sometimes that changes in the course of creating the work. Stone or marble sculptures or those that work with wood sometimes day once they began and the “stone speaks to them” what was visualized changes at the work progresses.

But no matter the medium, the intent generally is clear and even with photographs, it is not merely a snapshot taken, but a thought out image possibly with some post processing involved to achieve a final result the photographer wants to share with his/her audience.

An individual’s interpretation of the world. Whether that be a broader world, or a self-conceptualized version of the artist’s world. There is a lot in the creating, but the end result is in the sharing.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Attendees for a reception walk about looking at the artwork selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

People attending a reception gather to hear the winners announced at the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

People attending a reception gather to hear the winners announced at the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Local media, left, talks with the announced winners, from left Melissa Van Egdom, April Benson and Jerry Deuschle at the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

A list of artists selected for the 2022 Regional Art Show reception at Northwestern College’s DeWitt Theatre Arts Building in Orange City, Iowa Saturday April 30, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Refuge in Siouxland, Little Sioux Park, Correctionville

12 May

A Trumpeter swan checking out visitors at Little Sioux Park near Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

There are a number of wildlife refuge areas to be found in and around the Siouxland area. Visiting Little Sioux Park recently I thought it lucky to see some Trumpeter swans at the small lake there. Stealthily trying to get out of my vehicle to photograph these creatures I realized it was odd, they weren’t flying away, but rather coming toward me.

A Trumperer swan swims to shore to greet a visitor at Little Sioux Park near Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Two Trumperer swans come to shore to greet a visitor at Little Sioux Park near Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

It seems the swans at the park all have a damaged wing, and so live there. Enjoying a quiet area, free of predators, except maybe humans, and greeting park visitors maybe in the hopes of gaining a treat.

The swans ambled slowly but without hesitation up the fence line to greet the new comer and check them out.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A Trumpeter swan “grins” at a visitor at Little Sioux Park near Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Music in Siouxland, the Art Pahl-Peter Boe Accordion Festival, Le Mars

8 May
Performers at the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival included Burt Heithold, Wade and Ruth Bruggemann, Carla Drost, Barbara Rikansrud, Mary Mayer, Nancy Sharon and Preston Moerman playing in the auditorium of the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Sometimes entertainment in Siouxland is not a flashy affair. Big named artists visiting a local arena to play some hit or at a festival. A recent trip to the Plymouth County Historical Museum in Le Mars saw the continuation of the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival, after a hiatus of a couple of years due to the pandemic, like many other normally scheduled activities.

The Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Performers playing their first set during the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Many of the artists played traditional songs that accordion players play, especially with the attending crowd in mind. The music was nice though and made for a pleasant afternoon in a local museum. And a chance to walk through the place again to see what else was new after a couple of years.

Ruth and Wade Bruggeman perform during the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Carla Drost performs during the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Burt Heithold performs during the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. Heithold plays an accordion that belonged to Carla Drost’s father who also attended and performed at the festival in years past. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The players all knew one another as did most of those in attendance. There was a short remembrance of some former players who have passed in recent years and festival’s emcee played the accordion of a former player who participated in the festival for many, many years.

Not too many flashy performances, but one player did get a bit theatrical with his 55 pound instrument (which he said weighed 50 pounds the year before-age has that affect).

Perston Moerman puts some effort into his performance with his 55 pound accordion (while playing he said last year it was 50 pounds) during the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Perston Moerman puts some effort into his performance with his 55 pound accordion (while playing he said last year it was 50 pounds) during the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Perston Moerman puts some effort into his performance with his 55 pound accordion (while playing he said last year it was 50 pounds) during the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And those in attendance were appreciative of the folk playing and giving up a Sunday to perform. Sharing their talent and love of an instrument that not so many really appreciate for have possible even heard before. Some Sundays are meant to be a quiet, albeit, song filled day, to enjoy.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Accordion player and emcee Burt Heithold, standing, helps out Nancy Sharon, seated center, as they ask the attending audience to “name that tune” that she and performers Mary Mayer, far left, and Barbara Rikansrud , second from right played at the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. At far right is accordion player Preston Moerman who seemed to enjoy the exchange. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Players Mary Mayer, left, Nancy Sharon, center, and Barbara Rikansrud, right, perform at the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Fellow accordion players give Mary Mayer, Nancy Sharon and Barbara Rikansrud applause after they finished a particular song at the Art Pahl-Peter Boe accordion festival at the Plymouth County Museum in Le Mars Iowa, Sunday April 24, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Seeing a Historical Landmark in Siouxland, Garfield Township Hall, Beresford, SD

28 Apr
The former Garfield Township Hall seen Friday, April 8, 2022 in rural South Dakota, located south of Beresford, SD. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004 the hall was built sometime around 1908. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Bits and pieces of history are scattered throughout Siouxland, probably like many other places, and little recognized by most people, even those living in the area. Passed by and seen as some old building, maybe past its prime. The Garfield Township Hall is a historic place that served its purpose earlier in another century.

According to a Wikipedia account the township of Garfield was established in 1880. It was put on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. And currently it appears that someone or group is trying to give it a little TLC.

The former Garfield Township Hall seen Friday, April 8, 2022 in rural South Dakota, located south of Beresford, SD. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004 the hall was built sometime around 1908. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Township halls in earlier days was a place for pioneers and locals to conduct business in the area. At the time the region of Dakota Territory was being settled and developing from early trading posts and forts along the Missouri River. It is reported the hall was constructed sometime in 1908. It served as a polling place, a theater, a local government office, and a public meeting space. The Wiki report states that in 1936, the Works Progress Administration (WPA) added a basement and renovated the building’s facade to its present appearance. The Garfield Township Hall is one of the few remaining buildings of historic note that is still standing.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

The former Garfield Township Hall seen Friday, April 8, 2022 in rural South Dakota, located south of Beresford, SD. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004 the hall was built sometime around 1908. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Imagining History in Siouxland, Inkpaduta Canoe Trail, Correctionville

26 Apr
A sign informs a visitor about the Inkpaduta canoe trail near Copeland Park in Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

When I come across a piece of history in Siouxland I was not familiar with previously, I sometimes try to imagine what life may have been like in that time period, at least what the landscape might have appeared to those first settlers, and of course, to those already living in the region.

A sign informs a visitor about the Inkpaduta canoe trail near Copeland Park in Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The Little Sioux City River is the Inkpaduta canoe trail near Copeland Park Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

This particular day was not an ideal day to photograph in black and white. Overcast, darkish and a brown landscape does not make for exciting and provoking imagery. But given the history of the Little Sioux River and what an earlier exploring photographer might have seen and recorded make me think photographing in black and white appropriate.

Also this reference at Copeland Park in Correctionville to Inkpaduta does not include the sadder saga that occurred in Okoboji of where settlers were massacred by this chief and his braves which happened in retaliation to his own brother being killed by a white settler for the reason of not helping a starving group of Native Americans who had long resided in the area “now claimed” as his land.

The Little Sioux City River is the Inkpaduta canoe trail near Copeland Park Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The Little Sioux City River is the Inkpaduta canoe trail along with a forested area near Copeland Park Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

So I try to imagine the area as seen by those first inhabitants, long before farming reshaped the landscape or any kind of building touched the landscape. Photographing in black and white might be an homage to an earlier exploring photographer but probably did not do justice to the scenes depicted. I personally like a bit more contrast and saturated blacks. However I don’t spend a lot of time in post processing and do not use plug in accessories that might create a stronger B&W image.

It was just nice to find another slice of history I had not previously encountered and enjoy that day the relative quiet that was almost certain prevalent in the day when there was no traffic noise from a nearby roadway. Just the sound of leaves underfoot and the running of the water in the riverbed. Maybe as Simon and Garfunkel believed in their tune, “The Sounds of Silence”.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A forested area along the Inkpaduta canoe trail at Copeland Park Correctionville, Iowa Wednesday, April 6, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Enjoying Art Near Siouxland, and Just Seeing, Joslyn Musem, Omaha, NE

18 Apr
A security person walks through a painting gallery section at the Joslyn Museum in Omaha, NE Thursday, March 24, 2022. The museum will close until sometime in 2024 according to its website as an addition is added. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I enjoy walking about art museums for the obvious reasons. Those in Siouxland and those that are located near the area. The chance to look at and ponder what lies before one’s eyes whether you agree with or even like what you see. But the creator of the piece saw something, and a museum displaying it saw worth in the acquisition to share with the public.

The painting of the woman and cat at the Joslyn Museum in Omaha, NE Thursday, March 24, 2022. The subject’s eyes in the painting seem to follow visitors as they walk by. The museum will close until sometime in 2024 according to its website as an addition is added. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Walking about the museum’s various galleries and public areas can also test the visitor’s “seeing” and the architecture involved to pique an interest. And whether one sees the entire scene or just a detail helps shape perception on the part of the viewer and can in turn help develop one’s eye.

The last look at the fountain and formal entrance at the Joslyn Museum in Omaha, NE Thursday, March 24, 2022. The museum will close until sometime in 2024 according to its website as an addition is added. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The fountain in a main entrance at the Joslyn Museum in Omaha, NE Thursday, March 24, 2022. The museum will close until sometime in 2024 according to its website as an addition is added. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And whether one wants to record, or photograph, what one sees and how one sees something can also be an exercise to “practice seeing” and later look at again and determine if what was recorded is what was intended. Exercising one’s vision to help refine a way of seeing is not a bad thing. As an instructor once told me, painters have a blank canvas to add elements too to create what they envision. A photographer has a lot of stuff in their field of view and then must eliminate or distill down the image that is envisioned to share with others as well as what photographically speaks to that individual.

Walking through a museum there are so many ways to interpret what is there by the use of space or light or depth, shapes, lines and angles. Making a conscious effort to align these in what an individual might believe is a telling image.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A different perspective of a piece of art work at the Joslyn Museum in Omaha, NE Thursday, March 24, 2022. The museum will close until sometime in 2024 according to its website as an addition is added. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

A different perspective of a piece of art work at the Joslyn Museum in Omaha, NE Thursday, March 24, 2022. The museum will close until sometime in 2024 according to its website as an addition is added. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

“Winter Dressing” in SIouxland and Rural Nebraska, Winnebago, NE

12 Apr
Hoarfrost decorates a small wooded area in the countryside seen outside of Winnebago, NE Tuesday, March 15, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Mother Nature decorated Siouxland and rural Nebraska recently with remnants of this year’s winter’s season, as some low lying fog areas created that winter wonderland look with hoarfrost decorating the surrounding countryside. This kind of frost never seems to last long. That short shelf life between freezing and sunshine allows the ethereal effect to disappear quickly. Letting one wonder if it was a dream or actually real. Something William Shakespeare make have written about in one of his plays that also took place in the countryside.

Hoarfrost decorates a hillside seen outside of Winnebago, NE Tuesday, March 15, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Canada geese take off from a pond surrounded by hoarfrost decorating the countryside seen outside of Winnebago, NE Tuesday, March 15, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Hoarfrost decorates a grass stem seen outside of Winnebago, NE Tuesday, March 15, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I always find it challenging in photographing in this type of environment. One needs enough contrast to bring out the delicate details of the frost, especially if one is attempting macro photography. Blue skies are ideal because of the contrast, but that means the frost will be disappearing soon as the temperatures begin to rise and the sunshine helps the frost “disappear”.

Hoarfrost decorates a roadside seen outside of Winnebago, NE Tuesday, March 15, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Hoarfrost decorates a fence line in the countryside seen outside of Winnebago, NE Tuesday, March 15, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

As I drove to this area to look about I that particular day I drove through some dense fog. But the temperature there was not cool enough to create the frost I found in rural Nebraska. And just miles apart. Sometimes one gets lucky and gets to witness Mother Nature in action. The hoarfrost being a kind of benign action as opposed to seeing storms and the destruction sometimes wrought after those have ended. This day though, I just wished I had brought a thermos of coffee with me as the sun rose higher in the sky and the landscape changed before the viewer’s eyes.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Hoarfrost decorates a field seen outside of Winnebago, NE Tuesday, March 15, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

A frosty sight along Omaha Creek outside of Winnebago, NE Tuesday, March 15, 2022. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Anticipating Spring in Siouxland, Lauritzen Gardens, Omaha, NE

10 Apr
A barren winter’s look at the Lauritzen Gardens in Omaha, NE Friday, December 17, 2021. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

For some reason, this winter feels like it has lasted a long time in Siouxland. I know that probably isn’t true, but sometimes the slow march of time makes it feel that way. With unusually warmer days than normal, am guessing myself and others were spoiled a bit and the anticipation of warmer days lasting more than one or two and again some green scenery is palpable.

Renovation work is underway seen on a barren winter’s day at the Lauritzen Gardens in Omaha, NE Friday, December 17, 2021. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Renovation work is underway seen on a barren winter’s day at the Lauritzen Gardens in Omaha, NE Friday, December 17, 2021. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Turkeys have the grounds to themselves of a barren winter’s look at the Lauritzen Gardens in Omaha, NE Friday, December 17, 2021. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I look forward to returning to some favorite haunts and seeing how they have or have not changed. Lauritizen Gardens is one such place and the flowers in spring and early summer are a delight to behold.

I enjoy visiting places “off season” as it’s nice to see a contrast from what one would normally expect, especially at the Gardens as it’s generally “dressed up” and looking nice. And it looks like some changes are also underway so I look forward to seeing what transpires and as I understand it a rearrangement of assets will make it a better environment for the patrons’ visiting experience. Progress is just that. Good, bad, indifferent, everyone has their own take. Change is constant, and beauty is in the eye of the individual beholder.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A barren winter’s look at the Lauritzen Gardens in Omaha, NE Friday, December 17, 2021. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Renovation work is underway seen on a barren winter’s day at the Lauritzen Gardens in Omaha, NE Friday, December 17, 2021. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Turkeys have the grounds to themselves of a barren winter’s look at the Lauritzen Gardens in Omaha, NE Friday, December 17, 2021. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)
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