Tag Archives: Grand Meadow Heritage Festival

Siouxland History in Action, Grand Meadow Heritage Center

8 Apr

I always enjoy visiting small festival in local venues in Siouxland, like the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta. The people who run the festival revel in bringing history to life and sharing the past with current and future generations in the area. Today, some teenagers and youngsters probably have no idea how hard work could be one, to two, centuries ago. Reading about it is not exactly experiencing it.

A man runs a belt driven former steam powered wood saw at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Men work a belt driven former steam powered wood saw at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Having grown up on a farm in the 1960’s and ’70’s with some automation, one could acquire a few blisters while doing chores and other farm activities. At the festival a crew runs a milling operation, cutting lumber from tree trunks and making boards. The saw being powered in the past by a steam operated tractor. This past year it was operated with a newer tractor and again was belt driven.

Men remove a cut piece of lumbar from a belt driven former steam powered wood saw at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Most pieces of wood handled a few times before finding a resting spot with others, and then one more time transported somewhere else for use. And what I find as interesting and grateful for is that people still know how to operate this “ancient” machinery, a few years past the industrial revolution and the settling of a continent with growing populations and an expanding frontier.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Men take a break from working a belt driven former steam powered wood saw at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Two men demontrate using a chainsaw to trim down a tree trunk at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Enjoying Characters in Siouxland, Grand Meadow Heritage Center

25 Mar

When attending some festivals in Siouxland there are sometimes characters performing roles that make attending more interesting. At the Grand Meadow Heritage Center Festival there are some fellows and gals that portray characters out of the “Old West” who are the Western Iowa Border Agents, a western action shooting group that dress in historical clothing and try to authentically reenact scenarios that would have occurred in an earlier century.

Two men dressed in western gear and members of the Western Iowa Border Agents who participate in western action shootouts leave a blacksmith demonstration at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Members of the Western Iowa Border Agents western action shootout group relax before putting on their show at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

They provide interest in those attending and a contrast with how people are currently dressed, or have dressed since the 20th century began. Then are those who are very genuine and are who they are as individuals. People such as a person being a black smith, portraying the character yet also being an actual individual who does some smithy work in their “real” lives.

A blacksmithy checks out some recent work he did at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And others going about their lives, primarily living an outdoor life most likely associated with agriculture. My dad used to dress like a farmer 98.5% of the time. Clothes he was comfortable working in and in a way defined him as clothes also define others.

A vendor or volunteer giving out slices of watermelon at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A man sits and watches during the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

It will be interesting to see down the road how Goth’s and hipsters and others are remembered and a shift of how people dress that will occur in the future. Trends change, recycle and change again. For me it’s simply people watching and enjoying seeing real individuals, as well as those who portray another era, reminding us at times where we have been before rejoining the modern day race.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Enjoying History in Siouxland, Grand Meadow Heritage Center, Washta

17 Mar

I like attending various festivals in the Siouxland region. Each has its own story to tell and many times there is a slice of life one can find out about the community hosting the festival. Or a former community like at the Grand Meadow Heritage Center Festival held each fall.

An older couple walk about enjoying seeing equipment that was not an antique when they were young during the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The one in particular revolves around its rich agricultural past. Many of the exhibits are set up that reflect the fact that Iowa in earlier days contained a great many small farms, as did a lot Midwestern states.

Local residents and retired farmers reminisce about the days they actually used the “antique farming equipment on display at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Older collectible Allis-Chalmers tractors on display during the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

At these festivals I find many older people looking over equipment they used as young folk when mechanization was first being introduced into farming, beyond the horse drawn plow and planter. THe Heritage Center pays tribute to that former glory when work was a little more physical.

An “old timer” oils a corn shelling machine at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

An “old timer” feeds corn into the auger of a shelling machine at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

A volunteer watches the corn flow into a container wagon at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

An old truck hooked up to a wagon to collect the corn cobs after corn has been run through a shelling machine at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And then to watch people record the action with their modern device to share with others later makes me smile, both for the contrast of old and new but also that this way of life will not be forgotten.

A gentleman uses his smart tablet to film a demonstration of corn shelling at the Grand Meadow Heritage Festival near Washta, Iowa Saturday Sept. 9, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Iowa is still very much an agricultural state deriving much of its revenue from ag related business. But the small farm is no longer part of that equation. In America, bigger is better and these days necessary it seems to compete with big ag and multi-national corporations. It makes me a bit wistful, but like with other areas of life, progress continues, most times for the better and then some times it gives one pause.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

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