Tag Archives: lincoln nebraska

Enjoying Art Around Siouxland, Great Plains Art Center, Lincoln, NE

12 Feb

The Great Plains Art Collection and exhibit space sits just a few blocks from the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I am always an enthusiast to enjoy art galleries when I visit new places in and around Siouxland, and for that matter, those places I frequent more often. I accidentally walked by this exhibit space a couple of times knowing I was close, but not seeing the hanging signs from the direction I was coming from. The exhibit I saw featured a number of local or Nebraskan artists, in all different mediums. While not a big fan of sculpture, there was plenty of hanging art to view.

The Great Plains Art Collection and exhibit space shows off regional artists, Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And the next time I am in Lincoln, NE I now have a landmark that should make it easy for me to remember this place, as well as the history of the Siouxland area because of an expedition a couple of centuries earlier.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Statues of the Lewis and Clark explorers sit outside the entrance to the Great Plains Art Collection and exhibit space sits just a few blocks from the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The Grandeur Around Siouxland, the Grand Manse, Lincoln, NE

4 Feb

Exploring a new area near Siouxland where one’s never been to before gets the senses into a bit of a hyper drive. Is there enough time to get to see things and spend time dawdling once one finds them?

The Grand Manse was originally a government building which began in 1904 and reflects the Beaux Arts Neoclassical style of architecture popular in America from 1885 to 1920 and is seen near the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

One a recent visit to Lincoln, NE I came upon a former government building in the downtown area near the capitol called the Grand Manse. I am not certain what it was housed as far as offices, but the gorgeous structure has been repurposed into shops, restaurants and apartments like many former buildings located in a downtown area no long used for the original purpose. The inside area that was accessible is really beautiful and harkens to an era of construction when the workmanship was stellar.

The Grand Manse was originally a government building which began in 1904 and reflects the Beaux Arts Neoclassical style of architecture popular in America from 1885 to 1920 and is seen near the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Inside wood gleams and the grandiose amenities normally associated with turn of the century government buildings is still there.

The Grand Manse was originally a government building which began in 1904 and reflects the Beaux Arts Neoclassical style of architecture popular in America from 1885 to 1920 and is seen near the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

The Grand Manse was originally a government building which began in 1904 and reflects the Beaux Arts Neoclassical style of architecture popular in America from 1885 to 1920 and is seen near the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

The Grand Manse was originally a government building which began in 1904 and reflects the Beaux Arts Neoclassical style of architecture popular in America from 1885 to 1920 and is seen near the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I wish it was possible to see more of the inside of the structure but I am certain the apartments are splendid, and probably a bit spendy (sp?), being so near the state’s capitol. Maybe government workers of a certain caliber, possibly lobbyist accommodations and local business people. When the mind wanders…….

But exploring a place is what traveling to new places is all about and curiosity is just that, even if one doesn’t get answers. Life can be full of questions. But it’s fun to see what’s there.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A photograph hanging in the lobby of the Grand Manse which was originally a government building which began in 1904 and reflects the Beaux Arts Neoclassical style of architecture popular in America from 1885 to 1920 and is seen near the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A photograph hanging in the lobby of the Grand Manse which was originally a government building which began in 1904 and reflects the Beaux Arts Neoclassical style of architecture popular in America from 1885 to 1920 and is seen near the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Making Photo Choices in Siouxland, Lincoln, NE

31 Jan

Traveling around Siouxland and points thereabouts I find there is always a photographic opportunity. Some opportunities are better than others, but there are images to be made if one looks. I sometimes think I photograph too much, but if one is someplace, I remind myself that it might be sometime before I return again. Erring on the side caution I will photograph the same scene in different ways and sometimes using different white balances.

Plenty of outdoor seating available on the walkway up to Nebraska’s State Capitol this time of year in Lincoln, NE Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Recently on a visit to the state capitol of Nebraska, in Lincoln, I found the architecture absolutely stunning. The inside was gorgeous with various motifs and use of architectural elements. But of a concern to a photographer was the lighting. Pushing the ISO and using a fairly wide aperture and slow shutter speed and deciding which white balance. As a former newspaper photographer I strive to get it right in the camera, mostly shooting jpegs these days rather than raw. From the film days, unless using B&W film, I strove to photograph scenes using film tailored to the situation. Inside like in the capitol would require tungsten film because the lighting was warm and one might want to present the scene as neutrally as possible as seen by the human eye.

Daylight film would turn the scene orangish.

In a hallway in Nebraska’s State Capitol in Lincoln, NE Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Whereas a tungsten white balance setting or film would approximate it more the way the eye sees it.

In a hallway in Nebraska’s State Capitol in Lincoln, NE Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And yet, sometimes there is an in between. Maybe not a great difference, but subtly some areas take on a cooler look in areas.

In a hallway in Nebraska’s State Capitol in Lincoln, NE Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

So I photographed with a white balance of daylight, and later do slight adjustments to cool the scene while leaving it mainly warm in tone and feeling.  I also chose to use the incandescent white balance setting to render the image in a neutral (subjective as to what an individual considers neutral) representation.

And as stated centuries before, it’s in the eye of the beholder, in this case the photographer, to decide what to present to a viewer.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

History outside of Siouxland, The Haymarket, Lincoln, NE

23 Jan

The Siouxland area and points west were part of a territory in the late 1800’s that comprised of Iowa, Nebraska, Utah, Montana and part of Idaho and patrolled by Fort Omaha. During those early days decisions were made by those in power where specific seats of power would reside. The Haymarket in Lincoln, NE was one such place. Lincoln, formerly known as Lancaster, eventually became the state’s capitol. And it was in and around The Haymarket where the community of Lincoln grew up and commerce commenced.

Remnants of the historic Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Part of the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The Haymarket is an important historical part of the community of Lincoln, NE and in 1982 a eight-block section of the market received a historic landmark designation. Today there are many retail and restaurant shops around The Haymarket which makes it a fun place to hang out and walk about to learn more about the history of the area and indirectly the country itself.

Historical artifacts and items on display at a coffee shop in the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A chiming clock in the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The area has its own charm and sites that make for an enjoyable walk, even on a blustery and cold December day.

An unusal pedestrian walkway between buildings in the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Distortion in a shop window in the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

For me, seeing new places and learning history simultaneously is a fine way to spend a day. Throw in a couple of nice coffee houses for morning and afternoon breaks, and a restaurant for lunch, and it’s a good day spent learning more about an area while enjoying what’s there to see.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Shadows and lines in the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Celebrating the history of the Haymarket in Lincoln, NE Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

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