Tag Archives: Missouri River

History in Siouxland, the Umo`ho (Omaha) tribe, Macy, NE

14 Jun

A replica of an earth lodge of the Omaha Tribe at the scenic overlook viewing the Missouri River near Macy, NE Friday, April 25, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

As restrictions relax because of the coronavirus I look forward again in getting out and about in Siouxland and learning more about the area and its history. No matter where one lives, there are always little gems that pop up and present themselves to those interested in taking a moment to stop, look and listen.

History of the Omaha Tribe can be found at the scenic overlook viewing the Missouri River near Macy, NE Friday, April 25, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

An informational plaque informs visitors about the Omaha Tribe at the scenic overlook viewing the Missouri River near Macy, NE Friday, April 25, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Taking a highway I generally don’t drive  because of its out of the way location was this time one of those gems. A scenic overview rest area overlooking the Missiouri River between the states of Nebraska and Iowa also contained information about the history of the Omaha Tribe that has been in the Siouxland area for decades.

A replica of an Omaha Tribe earth lodge at the scenic overlook viewing the Missouri River near Macy, NE Friday, April 25, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A plaque contains information about the Omaha Tribe found at a scenic overlook viewing the Missouri River near Macy, NE Friday, April 25, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Learning history about places and people like the Omaha Tribe is so much different than when I was in elementary school simply because one can find more accurate, and less white-washed information concerning indigenous people than what was presented in the history books used when I was a child. The Old West and settling of these territories told from a perspective of Hollywood and a less than honest history by the government  of the U.S. at the time.

From a website of warpaths to peace pipes a timeline of the Omaha tribe:

  • 1541: Hernando De Soto, the Spanish explorer is the first European to encounter the Omaha

  • 1700: The first European reference to the Omaha tribe was made by Pierre-Charles Le Sueur

  • 1718: The French map maker Guillaume Delisle named the tribe as “The Maha, a wandering nation”, along the northern stretch of the Missouri River

  • 1801: A devastating smallpox epidemic decimates the Omaha people

  • 1802: The number of Omaha had declined to just 300 people due to sickness and warfare

  • 1803: The Louisiana Purchase

  • 1804: Jean Pierre Chouteau was appointed as the US Indian agent

  • 1804: Lewis and Clark expedition (1804 – 1806)

  • 1813: Manuel Lisa (1772 -1820) established Ft. Lisa, the most important trading post on the Missouri River, controlling trade with the Pawnee, Missouria, Otoe, and other neighbouring Indians from 1813 to 1822

  • 1831: The Treaty of Prairie du Chien in which the Omaha ceded their lands in Iowa to the United States

  • 1832: The artist George Catlin visits the Omaha tribe

  • 1836: They joined with other tribes in more treaties with the U.S. Government

  • 1837: Second great Smallpox epidemic kills many Native American Indians

  • 1837: The Council Bluff’s Agency supervised the tribe from 1837 – 1856

  • 1840’s: Series of bloody conflicts with the Sioux

  • 1854: The treaty of March 16, 1854 ceded all their lands west of the Missouri River and south of a line running due west

  • 1856: The Omaha Agency supervised the tribe from 1856 – 1876

  • 1865: On March 6, 1865, the Omaha sold part of their reservation to the United States

  • 1870’s: The buffalos had been deliberately slaughtered by the whites to the point of extinction so ending the lifestyle of the Great Plains Native Indians

  • 1876: Nebraska Agencies supervised the tribe from 1876 – 1880

  • 1887-1934: General Allotment Act (1887) began land allotment of Native Indian territory

But one needs to stop and take the time to learn about the history, as well as enjoying the natural beauty of an area while going about one’s life. So many twists and turns and speed bumps to sometimes getting to a destination. Life is all of that.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

An informational plaque about the Omaha Tribe at a scenic overlook viewing the Missouri River near Macy, NE Friday, April 25, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A look at the Missouri River separating Iowa and Nebraska seen from a scenic overlook near Macy, NE Friday, April 25, 2020. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Another Day in Siouxland a Different Scene Unfolds, Mulberry Bend Overlook

10 Oct

at the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Vermillion, SD Saturday, September 7, 2019. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

There is always a good argument for revisiting places one has previously visited and photographed, even in Siouxland. Time, day, time of year, it all changes what was previously witnessed and recorded. And for lucky photographers scenes are mostly not redundant making it more enticing to stop in and take a second, third or fourth look. I previously came across Mulberry Bend Overlook on a warm, humid and sunny day.

at the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Vermillion, SD Saturday, September 7, 2019. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

at the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Vermillion, SD Saturday, September 7, 2019. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I never tire of traveling about and seeing places, sharing them with friends on photo outings. One always hopes for optimal days, that is sunshine and blue sky, to photograph in, but weather and other unplanned exceptions can cause one to reevaluate how one sees and learns to adapt to situations that are not always ideal. Simple challenges are good for a photographer in broadening one’s perceptions and images captured. It also makes a hot cup of coffee taste even better on a damp, chilly day.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

at the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Vermillion, SD Saturday, September 7, 2019. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

at the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Vermillion, SD Saturday, September 7, 2019. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A rainy day at the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Vermillion, SD Saturday, September 7, 2019. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

A View from the Top in Siouxland, Mulberry Bend Overlook

20 Jun

A view of the Missouri River separating Nebraska (this side) and South Dakota and the Newcastle (NE) and Vermillion (SD) Missouri River Bridge at the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019. (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

I came across a roadway leaving Vermillion, SD that crosses into Nebraska in Siouxland recently that I wasn’t familiar with but was pleasantly surprised. The bridge crossing brings one to the Mulberry Bend Overlook that sits on the Nebraska side of the Missouri River and looks out over the river and back into South Dakota. It was easy to spend an hour looking over the landscape and hiking a couple of accessible trails that were short but nice.

Information tablets and a rest area at the top of Mulberry Bend Overlook above the Missiouri River near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019 (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

 

A family makes it way along a trail above the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019 (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

It’s these kinds of excursions that I enjoy coming across when out and about in the area. Something unexpected, although not for locals probably. It will be a great site to revisit during different times of the year as well as the scenery will change with seasons.

A trail leads down below the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019, and a different view of the Newcastle (NE) and Vermillion (SD) Missouri River Bridge. (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

 

A bench and an information tablet in a rest area off of a trail below the Mulberry Bend Overlook overlooking the Missouri River near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019 (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

The bridge was only recently constructed within the last decade or so but makes it so much nicer to travel back and forth between the two states without driving miles away to cross over the Missiouri in Yankton, SD. But some history lessons are also included for those so inclined.

The Newcastle (NE) and Vermillion (SD) Missouri River Bridge at the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019 (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

 

An information tablet along with others gives background information about the area at a rest point at Mulberry Bend Overlook above the Missiouri River near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019 (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

The views and really pleasant and spending time just looking and enjoying and hearing nature without a lot of other “white noise”, at least there were only a few other individuals there when I visited the site.

Possibly another little adventure to add to one of my Photo Safari classes I teach at a local community college, thinking those who attend that particular class will enjoy the views as much as I.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A view from a trail above the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019 (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

 

A look at the Missouri River from a trail below the Mulberry Bend Overlook near Newcastle, NE Friday May 24, 2019 (PHOTO BY JERRY L MENNENGA©)

Making Choices for Placement when Photographing in Siouxland, Sioux City

16 Feb

One of the toughest things to decide sometimes when I am photographing in Siouxland and elsewhere is how I want to frame up a subject and where I want to place that subject within the frame. Placing a subject within the frame of a photograph can evoke different emotions or feelings about that photo, even if it’s a simple outdoors image. Does a viewer believe they are right there with the photographer viewing the subject, or at a distance, purveying a scene from afar.

Perspective has a lot to do with presenting viewers images and the subjects contained within. And what is it the photographer wants the viewer to see, or experience with the image, if anything.  It’s all very subjective. But the photographer needs to show a person seeing an image what it is he/she sees, because it is their vision or perspective or object they want to share. And photography is all about visuals and sharing them with others.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A foggy day near the Missouri River Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019 in Sioux City, Iowa. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A foggy day near the Missouri River Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019 in Sioux City, Iowa. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Spring Temps bring Fog in Siouxland, Sioux City

10 Feb

Fog along the Missouri River Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019 in Sioux City, Iowa. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Recently Mother Nature has been giving Siouxland residents a roller coaster ride with temperatures going from extreme cold, to warm and extreme cold again. But visually it’s a break during the winter months, as well as a nice break to get outdoors without wearing 10 layers for warmth. I attended a presentation about wildlife photography recently and spent a few moments on the walking path nearby and enjoying the warmer temps and the fog created as it rose off the Missouri River. Not one anymore for being out in extreme cold, it was nice to spend a few minutes enjoying some fresh air and creating some images that don’t always occur. But Mother Nature has more in store yet this winter, and sometimes one needs to be patient to enjoy it.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

A foggy day along the Missouri River Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019 in Sioux City, Iowa. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Fog obscures the Missouri River Sunday, Feb. 3, 2019 in Sioux City, Iowa. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Enjoying the Views in Siouxland, Iowa Lakes and the Missouri River

26 Sep

I enjoy visiting areas around Siouxland that incorporate bodies of water. Whether it be visiting the Iowa Lakes region or up near Yankton, SD. I like water, watching it, the views and horizons.

Enjoying a day at the lakes in Arnolds Park, Iowa Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Enjoying a day along the Missiouri River in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

I have read that bodies of water have a calming effect on people, and just gazing out onto the horizon can sometimes give us momentary peace of mind as well as making us contemplate what our own personal horizon is, and if we are willing to take the journey to reach them once we figure out what they may be.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Enjoying a day at the lakes in Arnolds Park, Iowa Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Enjoying a day at the lakes in Arnolds Park, Iowa Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Celebrating Riverboat Days in Siouxland, Yankton

27 Aug

Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD is a celebration in a way of the community’s past history, and a way of remembering the nicer aspects of it. The Siouxland community was built with the help of river traffic flowing on the Missouri River which borders the community’s downtown area. There is a parade one of the days and a number of other activities as well as food vendors and artists’ booths that line Riverside Park which borders the Missouri River.

People walk along the riverfront in Riverside Park looking at artists’ booths during the Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

People line the streets waiting for a parade to begin for the Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

The parade in a way seems perfunctory or a prerequisite, although a lot of work goes into it and residents enjoy it, catcalling people they know in the parade and just enjoying the day as the community celebrates its history and way of life. Even a small kitten peeking out from a doorway seemed to be in the spirit.

Even a kitten inside of a store looks out to watch the parade for the Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Flags also wave at passing parade floats and agricultural items during the parade for the Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

Always a hit during parades, antique tractor equipment roll along during the Riverboat Days Parade in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

And on a nice day, looking at artist’s wares and having a selection of various foods, healthful or not, to choose to indulge or just enjoy a view of the river is a day well spent. And will continue to brings its residents and visitors together sharing a moment and having a nice time.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

 

A variety of artist items tempts shoppers during the Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

A young boy gets a painted face during the Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

People mill about checking out artists’ booth in Riverside Park along the Missouri River during the Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD Saturday, Aug. 18, 2018. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Seeing “spots” in Siouxland, Ice Flows, Yankton, SD

13 Mar

Friends of mine told me that they had seen some spectacular ice flows in the Missiour River along the banks in Sioux City. I never made it out there, but did take a peek while in Yankton, SD during an outing on a sunny, but very cold day in Siouxland.

Bits of ice flow along the bank of the Missouri River in Yankton, SD Friday, Feb. 16, 2018. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

While not as spectacular as friends had mentioned, it still wows me that the water is that cold during the winter to form ice flows along the river banks. And all the more reason why this person is waiting for spring to bring a respite and temps that are in the 40’s at least on a more consistent basis. This look at the river is a lot different than during the summer during a festival along the banks. I can feel the sweat slowly trickle down my back right now and be glad for it.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Tucked in among the trees along the Missiouri River, the Riverboat Days in Yankton, SD, Saturday, August 20, 2016. (Photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

 

 

Checking out the riverfront south of Siouxland, Omaha, NE

5 Sep

I made a sojourn down to Omaha, NE recently to obtain a lifetime seniors pass to national parks in the U.S. before a price increase. I didn’t even realize their is a national park office in Omaha or the fact that it is situated along the riverfront in the city.

A walkway spans the Missouri River between Nebraska and Iowa at the riverfront near the Lewis and Clark Landing in Omaha, NE August 24, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Not far from there a pedestrian walkway spans the Missouri River that connects Nebraska and Iowa. Giving views from above of the river and parts of the downtown area of Omaha. The day was pleasant, while warm, had a nice breeze coming off the river. And as I began walking along this river front after obtaining my pass I found it was only a few blocks the Old Market section of the city which contains numerous restaurants and shops. But the way there is filled with its own delights.

A walkway spans the Missouri River between Nebraska and Iowa at the riverfront near the Lewis and Clark Landing in Omaha, NE August 24, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Water spouts at the Heartland of America Park in Omaha, NE August 24, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

There is an interesting walkway that takes one above the ground and over various governmental water front areas that is an architectural delight as well as another shade cover further up the way.

Covered bridge walkways connect the riverfront area by the Lewis and Clark Landing and the Heartland of America Park to Old Market in Omaha, NE August 24, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

Shade and design are created along the riverfront at the Heartland of America Park in Omaha, NE August 24, 2017. (photo by Jerry L Mennenga©)

It made walking to the Old Market a nice way to work up an appetite and later check out some of the shops in the area.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

Walking the River Trail in Siouxland, Yankton, South Dakota

4 Apr

Over the weekend I took a trip up to Yankton, South Dakota, about an hour’s drive north but still within Siouxland. The weather is still deciding if it’s still winterish or spring. A sunny bright day, with wind gusts that drove the temps into the 40’s and peeking into the 50’s.

But it was a nice day for a walk in sunshine. I have looked at the River Trail along the Missouri River in Yankton previously, but had never walked along it before. I did an abbreviated jaunt and will probably go back on a less brisk day. I knew that Yankton was a gateway to the Dakota Territory in its early years, but didn’t realize it was the Territorial Capital from 1861 to 1883, designated as such by President Abraham Lincoln. A replica of the frame building stands along the trail along with a statue of a river boat captain. The Missouri River was used to ferry people and goods into and out of the territory beginning with the Lewis and Clark Expedition and later as people moved into the area to settle and further explore.

Its always nice to visit places, and more so when you learn a bit about its history. I plan to go again at some point, hopefully taking a class of Lifelong Learners along to enjoy it with me.

Jerry Mennenga

Sioux City, Iowa

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